Essay: Self regulation

Some teachers could say that self-regulation is the number one challenge they face in the classroom setting, while others may believe that children should be equipped with skills and knowledge on self-control and emotions. Self-regulation is a skill that allows individuals to thrive in life. The skill is developed during the early years of life and is predictive of academic achievement, wellbeing, and life success. Once children enter formal schooling, the demands on self-regulation increase. (Mcclelland & Cameron, 2012). With that being said children do not come with the skill set needed.
 
As educators, self-regulation is expected to begin at home and then tailored in the classroom setting. In reality, it is the complete opposite and when faced with the challenge of the non-compliant behavior, children are blamed for not knowing how to self-control their own emotions. In the article “Young Children”, it states that self-regulation should be taught at an early age of a child’s life, particularly beginning in the preschool programs (Florez, I.R., 2011). In order for this skill to be taught and implemented properly, the educator should also be well informed and trained on the factors contributed to misbehaviors, how social groups can fill the gap between missing skills and self-control, and how that will impact the child’s academic success.

There is a high need of self-regulation at Operation Breakthrough (OB). Operation Breakthrough services children from the birth up to 13 years of age who all come from low income families. Research indicates that children who grow up in impoverished areas, struggle with self-regulation more than their same aged peers with more enriched socioeconomic circumstances (Jensen. E, 2009). The program promotes school readiness by enriching the social and cognitive development of children through the provision of education, health, nutrition, and social services. The building is located on the corner of 31st and Troost Ave, Kansas City, Missouri 64139. There are many stories of Troost and its dividing line in downtown Kansas City. The location is unique because it strives to appear to be the breakthrough in the dividedness. The building is fairly up to date, clean, and secured. However, less than 100 feet on the corner, there are people who appear to be highly intoxicated or under an illegal substance. Across the street there is an old building where people hang around and sleep with the clothes on their back, shoes on their feet as their only accessories.

Operation Breakthrough services children Monday through Friday between the hours 6:00 am – 6:00 pm for more than 400 children. More than 87% of enrolled families live below the federal poverty guidelines. Twenty percent of children are homeless, living in battered women’s or homeless shelters or transitional living programs. Ten to fifthteen percent of the children serviced are in foster care or other placements due to abuse, neglect, or other family crises. The average income of our families is $12, 898.00. It is one of the largest single site early education and social services facility in the state of Missouri.

The organizational vision is that all children have the opportunity to achieve their fullest potential. The mission is to provide a safe, loving and educational environment for children in poverty and to empower their families through advocacy, emergency aid and education. The behavioral intervention is 90-95% due to students living in toxic homes and lack of social skills to self-regulate. They lack structure and stability and many are unable to cope with big feelings that escalate to major behavioral challenges such as non-compliant when given a direction, doing something even when they do not want to, and being okay even when others are not. The organization began in 1971 by Sister Corita Bussanmas and Sister Sailer as a response to requests for quality child care of the working poor. Over the years Operation Breakthrough has included social services: Adult Therapy, Theraplay, Violence Prevention, Family Advocacy, Occupational Therapy, and an On-Site Children’s Mercy Urgent Care Clinic. Other programs offered by Operation Breakthrough: Before and after school programs, mentoring/tutoring, USDA_Approved Meal Program, Dental Clinic, Family nurturing program, Housing, Women Infants and Children.

Families are put on a waiting list, until a spot in a classroom becomes available. The family is established a Family advocate who helps the parent(s) create a plan for success in which they support 100% by providing them to resources within the facility and in the community as well. In the therapy department, the therapist provides a one on one session with the parent and child to help build and strengthen the connection whether it’s because the parent may lack parenting skills, or the child is in state custody and the child is new to a foster home. Anyone who works in the building is also a Mandated Reporter.

Because Operation Breakthrough is a non-for profit agency, the organization relies heavily on the generosity of the community to continue its work. Less than 40% comes from government sources, city state and federal. The other 60% are grants from foundations, corporate and individual donations make up the rest. The total of preschool enrollment is 267 students. There are 206 African American, 11 Hispanic, and 17 Caucasian. The proportional attendance rate, African American: 88.67%, Muti: 88.74%, White: 86.76% and Hispanic: 88.21%. The drop-out of students is 10%. A total of 26 disenrolled, due to either student moved on to a different program, or because of the attendance policy student was withdrawn. Staff ratios, students to classroom teacher in the birth – three years of age are 4:1. In the preschool rooms 2:17. In the school age program 1:17. About 95% of staff are African American, three percent Caucasian, two percent Hispanic. 72% of the staff have a degree from college in Early Childhood Education.

Building wide, Creative Curriculum is incorporated through student learning. It is based on five fundamental principles to help guide and understand the reasons for intentionally setting up and operating preschool programs in particular ways. Ages and Stages is another form assessment that is used to screen children, at the beginning of the year and the end of the year. Desired Results Developmental Profile is a system used to track the student’s progress so that they are rated three quarters of the school year on 56 measurements that tracks their progress and readiness for Kindergarten. Implementation

Based on the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment, which is an assessment and planning system that is designed to promote resilience in children, a small team has identified self-regulation as an area of need. The results showed that behavior rated at a class average of 64% as an area of need along with self-regulation rating at 48.46% as an area of need as well. I have created a team that consist of myself, an Occupational Therapist, and an Occupational student to put this study together. We have decided to implement the use of Social Emotional skills using the five senses in a small group format that will target the missing skills students do not have to manage high emotions. The intention of Social skills’ groups is to lower behavioral needs in the classroom that will increase student achievement. The two measurements and assessments that will be used in this study are Devereux Early Childhood Assessment, and Desired Rating Development Profile. A class of 16 preschool children will be used for this study.

A pre-test using the Ready Class Project Baseline Assessment will be conducted prior to the study and a post-test will be taken at the completion of the study. The pretest will be key to determine what terms are being used to identify an emotion, and how many of the emotions can the student identify correctly. It is important to get an idea of what exactly the students know early on so the children are not repeating information during the six-eight week study. Reports of student’s misbehavior will be documented, to analyze the impact of Social groups as well the intensity of the behavior. This study will compare and contrast areas in the DECA screening go from a need to a typical or a strength. To examine whether social skills group increased student achievement, I will run a report on Desired Rating Development Profiles that will show the percentile of where students are in their academic growth. This rating is also an assessment that is administered in natural strength through teacher observations. It is an ongoing documentation of children’s knowledge and skills in everyday environments, mainly in the classroom setting. Desired Rating Development Profile is made up of eight domains. The focus of each domain is on the acquisition of knowledge, skills, or behaviors that reflect each domain. The two domains that will be focused on are Approaches to learning – Self regulation, and Social and Emotional Development.

Implementation

Based on the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment, which is an assessment and planning system that is designed to promote resilience in children, a small team has identified self-regulation as an area of need. The results showed that behavior rated at a class average of 64% as an area of need along with self-regulation rating at 48.46% as an area of need as well. I have created a team that consist of myself, an Occupational Therapist, and an Occupational student to put this study together. We have decided to implement the use of Social Emotional skills using the five senses in a small group format that will target the missing skills students do not have to manage high emotions. The intention of Social skills’ groups is to lower behavioral needs in the classroom that will increase student achievement. The two measurements and assessments that will be used in this study are Devereux Early Childhood Assessment, and Desired Rating Development Profile. A class of 16 preschool children will be used for this study.

A pre-test using the Ready Class Project Baseline Assessment will be conducted prior to the study and a post-test will be taken at the completion of the study. The pretest will be key to determine what terms are being used to identify an emotion, and how many of the emotions can the student identify correctly. It is important to get an idea of what exactly the students know early on so the children are not repeating information during the six-eight week study. Reports of student’s misbehavior will be documented, to analyze the impact of Social groups as well the intensity of the behavior. This study will compare and contrast areas in the DECA screening go from a need to a typical or a strength. To examine whether social skills group increased student achievement, I will run a report on Desired Rating Development Profiles that will show the percentile of where students are in their academic growth. This rating is also an assessment that is administered in natural strength through teacher observations. It is an ongoing documentation of children’s knowledge and skills in everyday environments, mainly in the classroom setting. Desired Rating Development Profile is made up of eight domains. The focus of each domain is on the acquisition of knowledge, skills, or behaviors that reflect each domain. The two domains that will be focused on are Approaches to learning – Self regulation, and Social and Emotional Development. Literature Review

There is no person in this world that is born with a skill that allows them to be okay when others are not. Or even to able to manage an overwhelming feeling when challenges arise. Every day it gets harder to build courage to do something you know you have to, but have those contradictory thoughts. Every child is different, just like every adult grows up to be different. As an educator we find ourselves repeating phrases over and over such as “please don’t do that, keep your hands to yourself, I need you to calm your down, go to the think seat, pay attention”. In other escalating moments, we have to stop teaching and deal with a behavioral issue at hand. The ideal scene is you would like to have an easy transition from one activity to another, instead you must leave no idle time so that student who has little self-control finds something she or he is not supposed to do.

More children especially at the early years of school are exhibiting more behavioral issues than teachers can manage. In fact, Preschool teachers report children’s challenging behavior as their single greatest concern (Joseph and Strain, 2003). Educators often blame children for not being able to self-control their feelings and expect them to have those skills already installed, but refuse to consider what the factors are contributing to the behaviors being displayed. The study done on “How poverty affects behavior and academic performance”, indicated that the correlation between socio-economic status (SES) and life stress in adolescents found that children with lower SES had significantly greater levels of negative life change compared to higher SES children (Gad & Johnson, 1980). Negative changes can include lack of parenting skills, children living in poverty, nurturing and supportive qualities are low, and parents are less involved in a child’s lives. Low SES children are often left home to fend for themselves and their younger siblings while their caregivers work long hours, and are less likely to participate in after school activities (U.S Census Bureau, 2000). A child living in that circumstance will not come to school already having self-regulation drilled into their minds and bodies.

Children who are living in stressful environments will have very little self-regulation attributes if that more than likely none at all. Children raised in poverty rarely choose to behave differently, but they are faced daily with overwhelming challenges that affluent children never have to confront (Jensen, E., 2009). Many children are misunderstood by their social and emotional deficits as a lack of respect, and are held at a high expectation to be in school with suitable emotional responses. Children must learn to evaluate what they see, hear, touch, taste and smell and compare it to what they already know (Florex, I.R., 2011). They must also learn to use self-regulation to carry out the response in a self-controlled, and safe manner. If they come into school at any grade level not having or experienced any self-regulation skills, they are unable to apply it to any previously skills known.

In the classroom setting, it should hold a positive climate where social interactions are happening between children who are different from one another. The high SES children should not be sectioned off in a corner playing together because the low SES children are too complicated to play with. As an educator, that should automatically be an eye opener for you and there is a need for change in the classroom if it is happening. Hosting social groups, will allow children and adults to be more intimate with each other, process communication, identify unknown feelings, and practice negotiation skills. A study from “A school-wide tiered program of social skills intervention” indicated, students felt it was beneficial because they got to learn how others felt when they feel left out, and how other people would solve problems. Another student stated it helped them build more self-confidence and taught them how to help others when they are down (Albrecht, S.F., Mathur, S.R., Jones, R. E., & Alazemi, S 2015).

The Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders defines Social Skills Group, as a form of behavior therapy used by teachers, Therapists and trainers to help a person who has difficulty relating to other people. The group size can depend on the age of children, but smaller sessions are likely to be beneficial. It is critical to understand students’ behavior and then lay out clear behavioral expectations. When dealing with children who live in poverty, it’s almost as if you’re playing an emotional keyboard.

Children raised in inner city poverty are more likely to display behaviors such as acting out, impatience and impulsivity, social graces, limited behavioral, and inappropriate emotional responses (Jensen, E., 2009). Skills missing need to be identified early so that they can be reached during Social Skills groups. The ideal smooth day of class would include, sympathy, patience, shame, cooperation and gratitude, in which those are the skills children going to Operation Breakthrough have never experienced and need to be taught. It is great way to implement Conscious discipline through Social Skills groups. It is a classroom management program which incorporates social and emotional learning based on research and practices in child development. Hoffman, Hutchinson, and Reis (2009) reported that preschool children and elementary school teachers who practiced the tenets of Conscious Discipline perceived a better school climate. They dealt with student behavior issues as learning experiences using conflict resolution strategies rather than traditional methods of classroom management; rewards and punishment.

If self-regulation is established in the early years of a child’s life typically they will perform well academically and take more responsibility for their own learning. According to Theory and Practice (2012) the effects of implementing Social Competence increased concentration and attention skills and social emotional competence, as well as reduced aggression and disruptive behaviors. Teachers are less equipped with resources and strategies to defuse noncompliance behaviors that are also preventing children from reaching academic success.

Focusing on social emotional competence in an intimate social group setting, students will be able to identify feelings, practice skills and strategies taught through the teacher. According to Reading minds and building relationships, this also builds the relationship between the student and teacher. The goal of teaching self-regulation through social skills is to model so students can imitate what they see, by using hints and cues. Students can refer to a signal given by teacher when frustration starts to occur so they know they can follow up with a breathing strategy or different coping skill. Followed by withdrawing adult support, students are able to negotiate with each other by using expressive communication. The article Reading minds and building relationships showed that a student had trouble with organization and transitioning throughout the day. The teacher taught and practiced with student a calming routine and they came up with a hand signal that signified the student was becoming upset. It’s easier to teach a missing skill to students more effectively in a small setting versus large group. Again, Social groups provide those intimate relationships and connections that are also vital to a child’s success.

Many children are at risk for dropping out, because they are unable to maintain the academic requirements needed. The small groups will have now targeted missing skills in the children that prevented them from being able to pay attention to people and things in the learning environment. They also now have been taught different coping strategies to manage high emotions. With children being able to manage high emotions on their own, teachers will less likely be interrupted in student learning, and the increase in student achievement will go up!

Tools for Testing

My overall study for this project was to demonstrate and gather data to prove that social skill’s group could improve student achievement. As a part of our programming at Operation Breakthrough, we strive to support the development of self-regulation. First, it involves one’s ability to control one’s impulses and stop doing something. Second, it takes one’s capacity to start doing something even if one does not want to because it is needed or required. Self-regulation occurs with our emotions, attention, behavior, and alertness. In the classroom, appropriate self-regulation looks like waiting one’s turn, listening to a story, engaging in a lesson and managing one’s anger or frustration (Blackwell, 2014). The Ready Class Project, is an experiment, where students can use their bodies in comparison of a car engine. Providing students the opportunity to explore the meaning of what each term means and comparing it to the idea of a car engine, will increase the amount of strategies children can use to reduce the amount of out of control behaviors that prevent student achievement. The following describes the concept of the Ready Class Project:

“When I’m sad or have no energy, my engine is running low like a car with no gas. When I’m ready to learn and feel just right, my engine in great condition. When I’m angry or out of control, my engine is running high like a car going really really fast”.

– Angela Blackwell

Below you will find an eight week layout of what each small group consisted of, over the few weeks. The Speech Occupational therapist and I collaborated together, in which I lead the planning and the groups for the success of this study.

At the beginning of the study, each student was given a base line test. The test consisted of a first set of pictures that demonstrated the child in the picture (sad, happy, or mad). The student had to name the emotion each child was feeling from those three terms. The second set of pictures, the child was asked to choose one of the following terms to describe the emotion the child in the picture was feeling: low, just right, or high). At the end of the study, each student will complete the baseline test, and there will be a comparison between each baseline test to define if the child is able to use the correct term to determine an emotion when given a visual. Social skills group will be held twice a week, and at the beginning and end of each group, students will get the opportunity to voice “how their engine” is running. This will allow me to see which strategies to increase self-regulation, is working for the student. Behavioral Reports are documented as they happen, describing the situation and behavior of the child. I will be looking for a pattern, of the child’s behavior and if the behavior of the child is decreasing over time (ex. Level of aggression, behavior, and life skill). The members of the team and I met once a week, and planned a week’s worth of social skills group. This gave us much time to prepare any props that were used in the group, and have additional wiggle room to review the next week’s group ahead of page so each person was familiar with the plan. This also provided us a time to discuss what we felt went really well, and what we could possibly change next time, due to the outcome.

Collected Data Analyses

A week prior to the study each student took a pre baseline assessment. The pre base line assessment was over a few days due to students absences or early pick up. The assessment baseline shows 55% of the vocabulary words (angry, happy, sad, and high, middle, low) were used correctly to relate to the picture shown at the time of the test which was taken at the start of the study. Week one day one, we introduced the vocabulary. Children read introduction book, sang “My bodies like an engine, the teachers modeled each engine category and children acted out each emotion in small groups. Teachers noticed that the children picked up on the vocabulary quickly from the book and song. A child stated during group, “I like the fast car”. They were engaged, while some became frustrated with the puppets to act out engine emotion because it was difficult to make the puppets move. Week one, day two we repeated the introduction by singing the song and reading the book. Students were broken into three groups, the first group went outside to look at a car engine and talked about high/low/middle and related to emotions. The second group focused on breathing strategies already used in the classroom as tool to change how we feel, and the third group sorted emotion pictures into the correct engine terminology. Teachers felt three small groups were the right length of time and teachers felt all children participated well. Teachers liked staying at one activity and the children switched groups. Children transitioned from groups with ease, indicated this model of small groups may be successful again. Children seem to enjoy engine song as they continued to sing it throughout the morning. Having one group outside helped add movement for the children. Week two, day one, we introduced high engine, and emotion vocabulary. Children read high engine book, “sang my engine runs high”. Students were broken into three small groups, the first being high engine dancing, freezing, and breathing. The second group lotion and belly breathing, and the third group learning about how to use the calm down space. One child stated “she was sad today, and did not want to participate”. Three groups made it difficult to manage children behaviors. Most of the children were able to act out emotion for high engine. There was a rise in acting “high engine”. The children demonstrated more correct identification of their engine as it relates to their emotions. Week two, day two we reviewed high engine and emotion vocabulary. They sang “My engine runs high” and read book related to engine “My mouth is like a volcano”, followed by graphing how they felt using and X. As a large group, we made a volcano. Teachers thought activities went smoothly overall. One teacher “believed My Mouth is Like a Volcano” to be a long book for this group. Teachers reported children appeared to be taking turns and completing their art without prompting. One child took apart his volcano and needed support to return back to activity. ”. Another child who became frustrated stated “my engine is running high”. Children demonstrate more correct identifications of their “engine” as it relates to their emotions during check-in and teachers liked check-in chart. Most children (except 4) discussed their engine was in the middle, and the group reflected children being ready to learn.Week three, day one low engine vocabulary and song were introduced. Children sang “My Engine Runs Low,” and graphed how they felt using an X. As a large group, we did exercises, yoga poses, and drank water as a “fuel break”. Teachers thought activities went smoothly overall, but time spent on carpet checking in with children was long. Children demonstrate more correct identifications of their “engine” as it relates to their emotions during check-in and teachers liked check-in chart. Singing songs during transitions of the group seems to be good strategy for children to wait patiently. Finding spots for yoga positions was tricky. Few were able to verbalize engine feeling low after exercise. Children enthusiastic about water as a low engine to middle engine strategy. This part of the activity was the most calm and organized. Most children waited in line for water patiently. Week three, day two repeat of low engine introduction. Children played low engine bingo by crossing off pictures with an “X” if on their card. Took turns spinning the wheel after had a calm body. Teachers thought activities went smoothly overall. Teacher observed kids attention spans decreased. Teacher reported that redirection works well and singing songs keeps them engaged. Teacher liked follow-up questions after activity to get feedback from kids and gauge understanding. Most waited turn patiently to spin the wheel. A few needed verbal prompting to maintain calm body and wait their turn. A few were able to verbally ID calm down strategies and/or change engine when it is feeling low. Some children stated the following, “I can use my Namaste or my balloon,” “I can use lotion to get engine back to middle from low”, “I can use a calm down strategy”. Week four day one, children used small red, yellow, and green cars to describe engine levels. Cars were labeled with one capital letter and children matched this to the same one on a parking space on the rug. All children enjoyed the new car/road rug. Some were able to play with cars and match letter independently. Most children are still developing their turn-taking and direction-following skills, but the novelty of a new addition to choice time may have contributed as a distraction. Most were able to match the letter labeled on the car to the same letter labeled on the rug with few verbal prompts. One child was very challenged by identifying letter and matching. All children used functional fine motor grasps to move the small cars around the map, including pincer and tripod techniques. Some able to spontaneously associate car color (red, green, yellow) with an engine level (high, just right, low). Most needed prompting to identify the car color and engine level and/or characteristics of that level. One did not associate the car color with engine level. Week four day two, the middle engine vocabulary and song were introduced. Children sang “I’ve got self-control.” For the large group activity, the children went outside to clean the teacher’s cars to change their car engines from feeling stuck in the mud to right in the middle through washing it clean. Children enjoyed the new “self-control” song and getting movement in after sitting for story time. Most children able to demonstrate self-control or “stop” when the song said “stop.” Most children enjoyed washing the cars, however they needed multiple verbal prompts to wait in line to get sponge wet in water. A child verbalized frustration when friends did not form a line and stated “one at a time”. Transition from inside to outside had fewer re-directions and prompts in comparison to transition from outside to inside. Week five day one, children listened to Ready Class Project engine book read by the teacher. The group participated in self-control song and followed instructions for speeds/song actions. As a large group we made stoplight and apple car snack seated at table. Children demonstrated self-control throughout the morning. Most participated in self-control song with appropriate actions and few verbal prompts. A few needed individual support to follow song directions or calm their body. All children demonstrated independence and good task management during cooking activity. Children waited for directions prior to starting activity, and children waited prior to eating their completed snack. All children enjoyed making stoplight creatively. A few children made appropriate “X” marks on the check-in chart. Most made plus sign-type marks or other shapes and are developing the “X” motion. Week five day two children listened to Pete the Cat and His Magic Glasses book. The large group art activity was to create their own magic glasses by gluing on lenses, decorating frames, and identifying how what they see makes them feel. Children needed some verbal prompts to remain quiet during reading. All demonstrated self-control when waiting for glasses activity to begin. Teachers liked having peers pass out materials to their friends. All demonstrated attention to step-by-step instructions. Some needed assistance with glue sticks and understanding how to apply glue for glasses lenses. A few children were independent with gluing their glasses. One child self-advocated for the materials she wanted. All needed demonstration of where to fold glasses. Some were independent in folding. Others needed physical assistance to fold functionally. All would benefit from more activities with precise gluing/folding. A few children were able to verbalize how the glasses made them feel or how they glasses affected their engine level. Week six day one, children took turns trying to match items pertaining to engines. One group was completed during choice time. Children attended to groups assessed on ability to follow directions, take turns, and problem solve. Some students were able to follow directions, other students needed several verbal/physical cues to follow directions. Some students were able to take turns, other students needed verbal cues to end turn and allow next person to begin. Most students were able to correct behaviors with verbal/physical cues, others were unable to keep playing game. Only one child was asked to leave due to they were unable to follow directions the entire game. Most students were engaged in the activity and able to answer questions pertaining to “How an engine runs”. In the future the group may benefit from multiple smaller groups, and certain children in each group. Some of the students were distracted by other students in the group causing interruptions in following directions and taking turns. Week six day two, children listened to The Ear Book, listened mindfully to sounds with eyes closed while waiting for triangle ding to signal moving to next square, circled calm sounds that they liked/disliked, and listened to various sounds and marked them on a bingo card. Children maintained attention during activity with long periods of sitting. Most colored in bingo squares for listening bingo independently. Some did not complete this part of activity. Most sat quietly and listened to music, talked about how it made them feel. Most felt the music made them happy/brought their engine back to the middle. All but three followed directions throughout entire activity and had to leave to manage feelings. Week seven day one, Children will take turns trying to match items pertaining to engines. This activity was completed during choice time. Children attending group assessed on ability to follow directions, take turns, and problem solve. One student able to follow directions through entire activity, including setting up game cards himself. One student required verbal cues to follow game directions. Both students able to ID connection between car/object colors and engine levels/feelings. Both students understood matching concept and match correctly. Choice time cut short due to child behaviors. Unable to assess more children in activity. Week seven day two, children listened to The Nose Book. They took turns smelling essential oils (lavender, lemon, grapefruit, cinnamon, breathe, mint) and marked those they do/don’t like on a charted piece of paper. The whole class makes scented play-doh seated at tables. Most students able to follow directions throughout both activities. A few needed some redirection from adults. Most developing skills at choosing which scents they like/don’t like and indicating it with coloring/circling. Many circled both like/dislike for scents. A few struggled with indicating their preferences either way. All children assisted in cleaning up playdoh activity and remained engaged throughout the longer than usual group duration. Week eight day one, children listened to The Hand Book, and Touch Song. They took turns touching different objects and trying different “fidgets” and marked those they do/don’t like, to discuss how touch can change how you feel. Majority of children struggled to follow directions and listen to teachers directions. Most displayed “high engine” behavior, including hyperactivity. Some children independently colored or circled their choices for objects they liked/disliked touching. Most needed prompting to make choices and keep up with coloring in/circling choices. All students required redirection and prompting during small group transitions. Week eight day two, children listen to “My Five Senses” book. They completed small group rotations consisting of activities with breathing/mouth including feather blowing, pinwheel and breathing strategies, and cottonball/straw maze. All children followed directions independently and waited patiently to take turns at each station. Most children participated in loosely structured small groups using appropriate behaviors. A few used straws and cotton ball maze supplies inappropriately while waiting their turn for the maze. Most enjoyed the activities and completed smooth transitions between groups. All glued picture of him/herself on driver’s license appropriately and with limited assistance needed from adults. One week after the eight week study a baseline assessment was completed on all children. The post assessment baseline took a few days long within a week due to children’s absences or early pick up. The assessment baseline shows an outstanding increase at 92% of the vocabulary words being used correctly to relate to the same pictures used at the beginning to assess at the end of the study. There was an increase of 37% within eight weeks, with consistent use of vocabulary, and the children being able to relate the vocabulary words with their own emotions, and then translating it to visuals. What made part of the study a success was the constant use of vocabulary, introducing each vocabulary word and implementing different strategies associated with that vocabulary word or emotion. Cause and Effect

The first first few weeks of the study were rocky due to the experiment being new to both myself and the students. The most challenging part was becoming familiar with the new routine of meeting in small groups twice a week. I encourage anyone who is doing a research study in a similar format, which was a lesson learned for myself is to make sure that I coordinate with my Supervisor in the future and readily have a set day(s) of the week in the event of any future plans that may take place, so that it will not affect the studies course. Another factor that could have impacted the study, in which I would keep alternating is how big the groups were each week. Some weeks I lead small groups and other weeks I lead one large group. I felt at the time and it was a decision made in the moment that switching up the setting and incorporating the activity into a large group went well. Some days I felt like some activities should have been broken up, that they were more intimate and other students could focus on the content rather than doing other things that disrupted the group setting. I am certain that this would have most definitely made a difference in the dynamic of the classroom. During the study, another implementation that could have a better outcome in the future is to have all involved in the small groups prepared for the lesson. At my facility, we worked in co-teaching rooms where there were two-three teacher accompanying the group of students. I obviously went into the groups every week prepared but other teachers commented that they felt the least prepared by not knowing what the small groups were going to consist of for that day. This was an easy fix that we could see visually having an impact in the small groups taking place. At the end of the study, there was not a transition to compliment the end of the eight weeks. So I myself being in the classroom when the study was no longer happening I noticed two to three weeks out, behaviors began to rise in the classroom. I realized that I should not have cut the study off at the eight week mark, and felt like it would have been beneficial to do a follow up with the students such as providing them a closure to the study or possibly implementing the vocabulary and strategies used into the classroom.

Review this student essay:

Name
Email
Rating
Comments (optional)

Latest student essay reviews:

About this essay:

This essay was submitted to us by a student in order to help you with your studies.

If you use part of this page in your own work, you need to provide a citation, as follows:

Essay Sauce, Self regulation. Available from:<http://www.essaysauce.com/education-essays/self-regulation/> [Accessed 10-12-18].