Rationale behind my performance recital (Communist Ideological Thinking)

My ultimate intention for this portfolio of evidence is to set forth and explain the rationale and research behind my performance recital with the theme of Communist Ideological Thinking. In choosing this theme, I aim to explore three main subjects; Soviet censorship in 20th Century Speech and Drama, the formation of the ‘communist ideal’ and … Read more

Ultimate End of Any Ideology: Totalitarianism Revealed in Orwell’s 1984

 “The ultimate end of any ideology is totalitarianism” (Robbins). In 1984 by George Orwell, the main character is Winston Smith who battles with oppression in Airstip One, Oceania; previously known as Great Britain, a place where the Party monitors human actions with Big Brother. Going against a ban on individuality, Winston commits rebellious acts … Read more

George Orwell’s “1984”:” A Warning of Control & Manipulation in Utopia

 Utopia: an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect. In the novel, 1984, written by George Orwell, Orwell warns the people of what can become of their society if there is no action taken against the government. The novel takes place in Oceania, where Winston Smith, a 39-year-old man lives … Read more

Satire and government tyranny in Nineteen Eighty-four/Animal Farm

There are many issues in the world and one of them are the social injustices. According to honorsociety.org, “Social injustice is the way unjust actions are done in the society. Social injustice occurs in a situation where the equals are treated unequally and the unequal is treated equally. Three common examples of social injustice include: … Read more

Comparison of “Newspeak” in 1984 and reality in North Korea

Constructing the Language of Tyranny; How Aspects of Newspeak and North Korean Language Enforce Totalitarianism The human perspective is malleable by features of language, as the process of thought relates directly to speech. For instance, countless variants of formal speech riddle South Korean language, rendering South Koreans sensitive to subtle differences in class. Indonesia lacks time-indicating … Read more

The party’s control in George Orwell’s 1984

George Orwell’s 1984 gives readers a glimpse into a frighteningly plausible future where censorship and absolute power have taken the place of freedom of thought and democracy. The narrator and main character, Winston, is a citizen of Oceania, a fictitious superstate ruled under an iron thumb by Big Brother and his authoritarian regime, which is … Read more

Orwell’s 1984 – warning against propaganda designed for conformity

All in all, you’re just another brick in the wall. Society loves conformity. To conform is to succeed, and those who do not are made an example of; an unpleasant reminder of what failure to conform looks like. The acid-dropping hippie, the Feminist, the LGBTQ member or the tattooed “freak”. Time after time we are … Read more

Literary devices in Animal Farm and 1984 (George Orwell)

George Orwell’s book 1984, has been an important work in the eyes of many critics because of its views on a totalitarianistic society. Peter Firchow states that, “Orwell is one of the great essayists of the period—as well as in his documentary books” (Firchow). Orwell uses a variety of literary tools to embellish his novel … Read more

Big Brother Is Watching (George Orwell’s 1984 and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451)

Cameras, televisions and microphones are everywhere. Our actions are constantly being monitored for various purposes. Though it generally poses no threat to our well being, nothing we do goes unnoticed. In George Orwell’s 1984 and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 neither protagonist agrees with the actions and views of their respective totalitarian governments. Due to the … Read more

Animal Farm, Harrison Bergeron, Dulce et Decorum est and 1984

‘People must stand up against authority’ is a reoccurring theme which is being used in our wider world amongst many others. The text that relate to this theme are Animal Farm by George Orwell, Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut, Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and 1984 by George Orwell. Within the novel of … Read more

Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” and George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four”

Both texts reveal that resistance and rebellion are futile; the system will always win in the end, at the expense of the individual. Discuss this with reference to both texts. When distribution of power in a society is too unevenly spread, or when one group abuses their power too greatly to the detriment of others, … Read more

Brave New World and 1984

Atwood suggests that the social prediction of both novels Brave New World and 1984 “cast their shadows over our futures, 1984 with its horrific vision of a brutal, mind-controlling totalitarian state and the other, Brave New World, which proposed a different and softer form of totalitarianism.” Brave New world can be interpreted as a ‘softer … Read more

George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

Introduction With Brave New World set just under 600 years after 1984 (Vega De Febles, 94), both George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World introduce dystopias, establishing societies that are both problematic and possible. The possibility of this type of society coming to be is what evokes fear in the reader associated with … Read more

1984: Orwell's Dystopia Criticizing Individuality Oppression& Winston's Failed Attempts at Rebellion

 1984 is an anti-utopia by George Orwell, which aims at portraying a totalitarian regime where people live in constant fear and oppression of the political elite. The novel explores the theme of individuality oppression by presenting a society, where people’s conscience and beliefs are corrupted, having a sense of individuality is unneeded, wishing for … Read more

Orwell's 1984 Relevance in Modern Society: Censorship, Surveillance, & More

 1984’s Relevance to Today’s Society In 1984, by George Orwell, a future was predicted where the government would be in total power and control. As predicted, technology is an addiction to many people in this century that consumes American lives on a daily basis. In addition to the prediction of technology, Orwell was also … Read more

Brainwashing & Language: What “1984” & “Mind Control” Reveals

Manipulation of the mind and language are depicted as a weapon to show the mistreatment of power. One of the most important themes shown in the novel 1984 is psychological manipulation. The Party is able to control what they think, what they do, and how they interact with each other. The Party enforces these awful … Read more

1984 by George Orwell

1984 is a novel written by George Orwell and was published in 1949. It features a dystopian society in which Big Brother is the face of the ruling party. The Party is compelling the usage of an imagined dialect called Newspeak, which endeavors to anticipate political disobedience by dispensing with all words identified with it. … Read more

1984 – Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction

One must utilize the theories Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction in order to adequately evaluate George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984. These three categories of literary theory allow the reader to observe the dangers of authoritarian or totalitarian rule, take caution of the peril that could result of the trade of one’s freedom for security, and urge one … Read more

George Orwell's 1984: Part 1 (75-149): Revolution Doubles as a Duty and a Rite of Passage

 The significant transition between part one and part two mark Section 2 (pages 75-149) of George Orwell’s nightmarish novel. From a big picture, the main theme of Part 1 is the awakening, and realization of Winston’s consciousness in which he identifies the evil of the INGSOC party, and his desire for change, and rebellion. … Read more

Executive Order 9066 / Orwell’s 1984 / Rothko’s ‘color-field’ work

There are a lot of questionable actions made by citizens and the government in our world today. From President Trump’s opinions on other countries and wall-building proposals, to the way some Americans treat their fellow citizens because of their gender, race, or sexual identity. One may ask, “Why that would pertain to a Humanities III … Read more

George Orwell’s warning in the novel 1984

George Orwell wrote 1984 after World War II to give a warning to the raising of USSR and Nazi Germany. He described a fictional government that is extremely dictatorial in 1984. The Inner Party of Oceania control people’s mind through manipulating media contexts, torturing thought criminals, and instigating people’s hate toward other nations. The party … Read more

1984 vs Brave New World

Society often chooses between the safety of its people and the safety of its principles. Either may be compromised for the sake of the other in drastic situations, but ultimately, a balance exists. Who creates this balance and what the balance is like, however, determines how “good” the society is. Still, “good” cannot be used … Read more

Mr. Charrington in 1984

Mr. Charrington is a fairly old man who, to Winston’s initial impression, is a friendly and helpful individual whom like Winston, has an affinity for history. Mr. Charrington appears for the first time towards the beginning of the novel. He is the owner of an antique store in the prole district of London, which  is … Read more

George Orwell – Shooting an Elephant, Animal Farm & 1984

George Orwell was born as Eric Arthur Blair on June 25th, 1903 in Motihari, British India. He described his family background as strictly “lower-upper-middle class”. This label did not have much of a significance until his enrollment in St Cyprian’s School at the age of eight.  As a scholarship student, he was constantly reminded of … Read more

The relevance of Brave New World and 1984 in Modern Society

Introduction Brave New World and 1984 are both over sixty years old. However, they continue to be read and studied in the modern day. Both novels were intended to show that a perfect society is not achievable; 1984 was written to warn the Western world of the dangers of Communism, and Brave New World was … Read more

Literary Analysis of Gender Roles in the Novel 1984

In the fictitious novel 1984, George Orwell uses stereotypical female characters to illustrate that men are more powerful physically and intellectually and more important in their place in society. Although Orwell portrays many different characteristics, he tends to illustrate three main roles for the women throughout the novel. The first role we see is the … Read more

George Orwell’s 1984 / Fritz lang’s Metropolis

The themes of dystopia and the revolution and rebellion that it provokes, are highly prevalent throughout George Orwell’s literary masterpiece, Nineteen Eighty-Four (often stylised as 1984), as well as Fritz lang’s revolutionary silent film, Metropolis. To a reader who has a general historical knowledge of the eras with which each text was produced, it would … Read more

Trump’s America compared with George Orwell’s 1984 – key similarities

On several occasions, we speak of literature on a light note. Sometimes we see the fictitious work of writers as part of history or a future that may never come to pass in our generation. Whether the authors highlight concerns over the economy, environmental degradation, political anarchy and censorship, morality, or general societal guidelines, it … Read more

Compare Orwell’s totalitarian Oceania with power dominance of Harvey Weinstein

Introduction George Orwell’s classic novel 1984 directs us to review our understanding of a dystopian world, to challenge our beliefs, and warns against the power of totalitarianism.  He writes about the government controlling everything in the fictional country of Oceania, where the leadership abuses its power by controlling people’s thoughts and actions through fear and … Read more

Ultimate End of Any Ideology: Totalitarianism in Orwells 1984

 “The ultimate end of any ideology is totalitarianism” (Robbins). In 1984 by George Orwell, the main character is Winston Smith who battles with oppression in Airstip One, Oceania; previously known as Great Britain, a place where the Party monitors human actions with Big Brother. Going against a ban on individuality, Winston commits rebellious acts … Read more

Exploring the Restructuring of American Society Since 9/11: The Patriot Act and Its 1984 Connections

 The Restructuring of American Society and Government Post 9/11: Results of Crisis Management and Anti-Terrorist Regulations (and their connections to George Orwell’s 1984) Evangeline Ives, 1604963 Political Science 101 – Introduction to Politics John Church “Big Brother is Watching You” Will Varner, 2010. Examining the patterns of American democracy, and government agencies in light … Read more

Orwells #MeToo Moment in 1984 w/Ideas of Feminism, Power and Control

 Introduction  George Orwell’s classic novel 1984 directs us to review our understanding of a dystopian world, to challenge our beliefs, and warns against the power of totalitarianism.  He writes about the government controlling everything in the fictional country of Oceania, where the leadership abuses its power by controlling people’s thoughts and actions through fear … Read more

Problems with Thinking: Tech, Privacy, & 1984 – Louise L. Hay

 An American motivational author Louise L. Hay once said, “ I do not fix problems. I fix my thinking. Then problems fix themselves”(Hay). Many of the problems people face today require much thinking to solve. Technology has taken a toll on the community and the way people think. Articles such as, The effects of … Read more

Analyze Orwell’s 1984 with Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction Theory

 One must utilize the theories Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction in order to adequately evaluate George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984. These three categories of literary theory allow the reader to observe the dangers of authoritarian or totalitarian rule, take caution of the peril that could result of the trade of one's freedom for security, and urge … Read more

How Ben Stein & 1984 Prove the Importance of Resisting Oppression & Fostering Human Emotions

 Ben Stein, an American writer, a political and economic commentator once wrote; “it is inevitable that some defeat will enter even the most victorious life. The human spirit is never finished when it is defeated…it is finished when it surrenders.” The novel 1984 by George Orwell reflects this statement by proving it to be … Read more

Exploring the Complexity of Mr. Charrington in “1984” by George Orwell

 Mr. Charrington is a fairly old man who, to Winston’s initial impression, is a friendly and helpful individual whom like Winston, has an affinity for history. Mr. Charrington appears for the first time towards the beginning of the novel. He is the owner of an antique store in the prole district of London, which … Read more

Oppression in George Orwell’s 1984 with “Big Brother is Watching You”

 Ayathma Wickramasinghe Professor Sember International Relations June 8, 2018 Propaganda Project “This is America” – Childish Gambino Recently in the United States, gun violence has been a recurring case. From police shootings, mass shootings of popular public areas, and school shootings. “This is America” sung by Childish Gambino portrays and symbolizes the significant events … Read more

1984 Book Two, Chapter 4 Analysis: The Freedom of Love and Rebellion in Orwell’s Classic

 Character Analysis Syme: “He is too intelligent. He sees too clearly and speaks too plainly. The Party does not like such people” (Orwell 33). Intelligence is known as a good quality to possess. People strive to gain intelligence so that it will benefit them. That said, Syme’s intellect is a flaw. After a while, … Read more

Dystopian Futures: 1984 vs Brave New World & Security vs Choice

 1984 vs Brave New World Society often chooses between the safety of its people and the safety of its principles. Either may be compromised for the sake of the other in drastic situations, but ultimately, a balance exists. Who creates this balance and what the balance is like, however, determines how “good” the society … Read more

1984: George Orwell’s Gender Roles & Anti-Feminist Bias

 Emma Chivers English 10 Professor Tricic March 28, 2017 Literary Analysis of Gender Roles in the Novel 1984 In the fictitious novel 1984, George Orwell uses stereotypical female characters to illustrate that men are more powerful physically and intellectually and more important in their place in society. Although Orwell portrays many different characteristics, he … Read more

Control & Manipulation in Orwell’s 1984: Power of Big Brother

 Control and Manipulation of Big Brother Nineteen eighty-four by George Orwell, is a one of a kind novel with amazing themes. In George Orwell’s 1984, the main character, Winston Smith battles with brutality in Oceania, a world where everyone is being belittled and looked closely by the Inner Party. Though, Winston tries to defy … Read more

Ideas of Conformity, Freedom & Individuality in “Metropolis” & “1984”

 Fritz Lang’s expressionist film, Metropolis (1927) and George Orwell’s Swiftian satire Nineteen Eighty Four (1949) dramatise the impact of repressive governments upon the individual. Lang reflects the anxieties of the Weimar Republic of Germany, under the stresses following the First World War, highlighting the consequences of rapid industrialisation and the subsequent disunity between the … Read more

Indoctrination of Children: Please Do Not Mark Us!

Cyril Connoly once said, ‘While thoughts exist, words are alive and literature becomes an escape, not from, but into living.’ Truly, thoughts are our keys to open the gates of freedom and get away from man’s world of madness and hopelessness. However, if these thoughts are suppressed, then men will lose all sense of individuality … Read more

Nineteen Eighty-Four

Winston Smith is a low-ranking member of the ruling Party in London (in the nation of Oceania). The Party is controlling everything in Oceania likewise it is controlling Winston Smith. Everywhere Winston goes he is being watched by the leader of the Party, known only as Big Brother. Winston is frustrated by the oppression of … Read more

About 1984

1984 is a visionary and disturbing novel, in which a haunting setting in our near future is established. Orwell’s writing implies that the current unbalanced circumstances of the world are enough to throw society, in the span of one generation, into tragedy. He displays a profound cynicism about the ability of the individual heart; its spirit of love and freedom and the power to survive oppressive indoctrination.

The novel is a dystopia, its purpose being ‘a serious vision of society as a single intellectual pattern’ (Gorman Beauchamp). The characters could be seen as mouthpieces of the ideas they present, or the author’s views. Orwell’s politics were not only Left but to the dissident Left, directly contradicting what is one of his key themes in the novel: totalitarianism. Perhaps it is his political view that encourages him to be so vivid in his writing, showing that the effort of The Party’s overwhelming presence of surveillance tools and manipulation of language create a society ripe for exploitation by a less than just political leadership.

1984 can be seen to be a prophecy for our future. ‘The implied prediction [is] that the dawn of the new era is already near at hand’ (Edward Bellemy). This was one interpretation of the novel which was then contradicted by Orwell, as he stated that he didn’t ‘believe that society will necessarily arrive, but could arrive,’ and that ‘totalitarian ideas have taken root in the minds of intellectuals everywhere’. He is alerting us to what could happen via using systems of surveillance to protect us from war, terror and disease. Ultimately, the Party’s argument is what good is freedom if you’re unprotected from foreign aggression? Big Brother would insist that kind of freedom is slavery (one of the slogans).

In Oceania, political realities convince Winston and others that it’s necessary to eliminate ‘unreliable elements’ as that refers to enemies from Eastasia or Eurasia. But when the Party uses its absolute power over media and public language ‘to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable’ by purely eradicating Winston’s neighbours and workmates, that is pure oppression. Although our democracy may appear to protect us against totalitarian control, one need only cast a casual glance at the government’s efforts to defeat terrorism by avoiding civil liberties to see how governments convince us to sacrifice freedom for security.

Winston and Julia hunger for a ‘secret’ and ‘private’ life, an inch of personal space that is indeed ‘small and… fragile and… the only thing in the world worth living for’. This inch is denied them, and it leads to their sadly inevitable doom. As Donne once quoted, ‘no man is an island’; they both lust for some form of emotional connection. Although it is clear that they are not compatible in many ways, he longs for her as a means of being able to have a natural human communication, to interact with another human in a way that is open and unknown by the Party. Yet again, the totalitarian regime enforces these laws that ban all forms of emotional bonds between their citizens; to tell someone they love them requires courage as it is seen to be dangerous.

Possessing a relationship, be it a romantic or platonic one, is forbidden by the Party, as it creates the threat of emotional bonds in which they can share original thoughts or ideas; any rebellion is a threat as it can entice others to follow. Sexual fantasies are sadistic due to the repression of sexuality; Winston’s memory of the prostitute was depicted as taboo and violent. Winston shares his views with Julia, and it is apparent to the reader that she is disinterested. He views their relationship as political, whereas she enjoys merely beating the party in the limited way she can and makes no attempt to overthrow them. Primarily, defying the Party is the aim, so Winston claims to love Julia ‘more with the more men’ she’s had, a seemingly romantic comment to her.

Winston is conscious of his intellectual limitations, yet still believes that he is correct in any contradictory thought to the Party. Intelligence, or the ability to question the status quo, seems to Winston as a guarantee of thoughtcrime and eventual detection and extinction. His fatalistic expectations in the case of Syme and Parsons come true.

Orwell’s novel remains an argument for maintaining individuality as the only means for preserving democracy. Strong leadership initially inspires us to better things, but Big Brother shows how power in the hands of too few leads to corruption. Force is the entitlement of official power, the same as in any propaganda initiated either by seemingly democratic or totalitarian forces. Successful propaganda suggests a definite object of hate and contempt, which should be blamed for all disasters and consequently unite all people on the opposite side against it. Immigrants, Muslims, homosexuals, terrorists remain convenient symbolic targets for hate in the speeches and public events of political oppressors who offer a distraction from their abuses. In the novel, the Party illustrates this principle through public executions, the Two Minutes Hate, and their ever-present messages of manipulation broadcast on telescreen; essentially, a media with a two-way component.

Winston finds little escape from this universal brainwashing courtesy of The Party, bringing ‘the sound of marching, charging feet’ to one’s doorstep every morning. Orwell utilises satire to make the flaws of the government evident The party possesses a sadistic desire to make people they deem guilty suffer for even the smallest of ‘crimes’. Beauchamp ultimately summarised Orwell’s satirical intention, stating he ‘exaggerated the motive far beyond the historical evidence’.

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Writing an essay about 1984

When writing an essay about 1984, you should discuss these themes:

1. Totalitarianism and Oppression:

George Orwell‘s novel 1984 portrays a world of oppressive totalitarianism and extreme government control. Analyze how the party maintains power and how it affects the citizens of Oceania.

2. Surveillance and Privacy:

Consider the themes of privacy, surveillance, and Big Brother‘s watchful eye. How does the party use technology and psychological manipulation to control and oppress its citizens?

3. Language and Manipulation:

Analyze the role of language in 1984 and how the party manipulates language to control the people.

4. Rebellion and Hope:

Explore the theme of rebellion and how Winston and other characters resist the oppressive party. Discuss the struggle between hope and despair and how it is portrayed in the novel.

5. Memory and History:

Discuss how memory and history are used in 1984 to control and manipulate the citizens. Consider how the party rewrites the past and how Winston attempts to remember the truth.