Home > Health essays > Medical hygiene

Essay: Medical hygiene

Essay details and download:

  • Subject area(s): Health essays
  • Reading time: 3 minutes
  • Price: Free download
  • Published: 7 February 2019*
  • File format: Text
  • Words: 716 (approx)
  • Number of pages: 3 (approx)

Text preview of this essay:

This page of the essay has 716 words. Download the full version above.

Many obstacles still remain when it comes to saving patients and giving them the best treatment outcomes possible in the field of medicine. One of the major limitations to receiving supreme healthcare is the potential for exposure to healthcare associated infections within hospital and acute healthcare centers. The 4 main types of healthcare associated infections are Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI), Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), Surgical Site Infection (SSI), and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP) (CDC, 2013). Healthcare-associated infections in the United States lead to around 75,000 deaths in the United States annually (Magill, 2014). In addition to deaths, they have a huge economic impact of over 9.8 billion dollars associated with the treatment, and hospitalizations of patients who acquired these infections (Zimlichman et al., 2013). The elimination of HAI’S is possible and contingent upon the enforcement of stricter guidelines for prescribing antibiotics, establishing new standards on a federal level to ensure that smaller institutions and states have sufficient protocols, the proper surveillance and monitoring techniques, and influencing many stakeholders to implore more transparency and culpability.
Epidemiology has been used in the identification of the source and cause of many diseases in the medical field. More specifically, descriptive and analytical studies were used to identify the source of healthcare associated infections (HAI). One of the first health care professionals credited with the finding that patients could have diseases transmitted to them by medical providers was Ignaz Semmelweis, and Austrian obstetrician (Noakes et al., 2008). By using epidemiologic analysis, unbeknownst to him at the time, he was able to note that patients cared for by specific medical care providers had higher rates of maternal and infant mortality, despite the same treatment methods. He noted that the physicians’ hands and scalpel’s contained the same microorganisms transmitted to the patient and implemented chlorinated lime hand washing in their clinic by all staff members (Noakes et al., 2008). Though initially discounted by the medical establishment, Semmelweis’s discoveries, when proved by the germ theory and Koch’s postulates, lead to increased hand hygiene, had a major decrease in mortality rates, and lead to the first description of HAI’s (Noakes et al., 2008).
Over 160 years later, many obstacles still remain when it comes to saving patients and giving them the best treatment outcomes possible in the field of medicine. In addition to the natural progression of diseases and poor prognosis, one of the major limitations to receiving supreme healthcare is the potential for exposure to healthcare associated infections within hospital and acute healthcare centers. With the added use of technology and medical tools, comes the added potential for the devices used in medical practices to be improperly cleaned, stored, sanitized, are exposed to infections.
A healthcare-associated infection, also known as nosocomial or hospital infections, is defined as a disease obtained while being treated or while residing in a health care setting, without the prior existence of this illness (Horan, Andrus, Dudeck, 2008). It can be procured in various ways including in a hospital or center admission, in surgery, in a hemodialysis unit, or while at the facility prior to dismissal. The 4 main types of healthcare associated infections are Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI), Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), Surgical Site Infection (SSI), and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP) (CDC, 2013).
Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) are contracted within a central line of a catheter. When the catheter is placed within a patient’s large vein for blood draws or to administer fluids and medicines, they are exposed to various infections with direct assess to their bloodstream. Due to the fact that these lines are inserted within clinical settings and can be left in the openings for days, weeks, or months, patients are often at a high risk for a serious infection. In addition to the high incidence of these infections, it is often hard to obtain proper surveillance data due to the fact that they may be underreported because they are often erroneously attributed to another infections (Thompson et al., 2013).
Ultimately, these preventable infections result in thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in disease burden attributed to the U.S. healthcare system (Thompson et al., 2013). Despite the incredible strides that have been made as a result of surveillance, research is going to be needed to address the reliability and validity of the surveillance data to prevent future infections (Pronovost, Needhan, Berenholtz, 2006).

...(download the rest of the essay above)

About this essay:

If you use part of this page in your own work, you need to provide a citation, as follows:

Essay Sauce, Medical hygiene. Available from:<https://www.essaysauce.com/health-essays/medical-hygiene/> [Accessed 09-06-24].

These Health essays have been submitted to us by students in order to help you with your studies.

* This essay may have been previously published on Essay.uk.com at an earlier date.