Rationale behind my performance recital (Communist Ideological Thinking)

My ultimate intention for this portfolio of evidence is to set forth and explain the rationale and research behind my performance recital with the theme of Communist Ideological Thinking. In choosing this theme, I aim to explore three main subjects; Soviet censorship in 20th Century Speech and Drama, the formation of the ‘communist ideal’ and … Read more

Ultimate End of Any Ideology: Totalitarianism Revealed in Orwell’s 1984

 “The ultimate end of any ideology is totalitarianism” (Robbins). In 1984 by George Orwell, the main character is Winston Smith who battles with oppression in Airstip One, Oceania; previously known as Great Britain, a place where the Party monitors human actions with Big Brother. Going against a ban on individuality, Winston commits rebellious acts … Read more

George Orwell’s “1984”:” A Warning of Control & Manipulation in Utopia

 Utopia: an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect. In the novel, 1984, written by George Orwell, Orwell warns the people of what can become of their society if there is no action taken against the government. The novel takes place in Oceania, where Winston Smith, a 39-year-old man lives … Read more

“Exploring George Orwell and Ernest Hemingway’s Perspectives on the Spanish Civil War

 Table of contents:  – Introduction……………………….………………………………… Page: 3 – Reaching to the reader …………………………………………….. Page: 4 Deadly atrocities…………………………………. ………………… Page:5 Endurance of issues………………………………………………… Page: 7 Political debates…………….……………………………………… Page: 8 Conclusion………………………………….……………………….. Page:9 Bibliography……………………………………………………….. .Page:10 Introduction: Both authors George Orwell and Ernest Hemingway have had a major impact on the literary world of the 20th century. There … Read more

Satire and government tyranny in Nineteen Eighty-four/Animal Farm

There are many issues in the world and one of them are the social injustices. According to honorsociety.org, “Social injustice is the way unjust actions are done in the society. Social injustice occurs in a situation where the equals are treated unequally and the unequal is treated equally. Three common examples of social injustice include: … Read more

Comparison of “Newspeak” in 1984 and reality in North Korea

Constructing the Language of Tyranny; How Aspects of Newspeak and North Korean Language Enforce Totalitarianism The human perspective is malleable by features of language, as the process of thought relates directly to speech. For instance, countless variants of formal speech riddle South Korean language, rendering South Koreans sensitive to subtle differences in class. Indonesia lacks time-indicating … Read more

The party’s control in George Orwell’s 1984

George Orwell’s 1984 gives readers a glimpse into a frighteningly plausible future where censorship and absolute power have taken the place of freedom of thought and democracy. The narrator and main character, Winston, is a citizen of Oceania, a fictitious superstate ruled under an iron thumb by Big Brother and his authoritarian regime, which is … Read more

Abuse of power, depletion of self-identity and free will in modern times (Orwell)

George Orwell’s 1984 is a dystopian novel that follows Winston Smith, a normal employee in the Ministry of Truth. Life in 1984 is bleak, non-whimsical and ensued in war. With the depletion of self-identity under the tyrannical guise of “Big Brother”, 1984 serves as a commentary on politics and power. With the abuse of power … Read more

Orwell’s 1984 – warning against propaganda designed for conformity

All in all, you’re just another brick in the wall. Society loves conformity. To conform is to succeed, and those who do not are made an example of; an unpleasant reminder of what failure to conform looks like. The acid-dropping hippie, the Feminist, the LGBTQ member or the tattooed “freak”. Time after time we are … Read more

Animal Farm & Letter from Birmingham Jail: freedom and the necessities of justice and education

The topic of justice has inevitably made its way into the course of history. Whether it be the Protestant-Catholic rivalry in Northern Ireland of the 1920s, or the LGBT movement of today, the topics of injustice and justice still cause turmoil. Simon Wiesenthal, an anti-Nazi activist, and survivor of the Janowska concentration camp, once stated, … Read more

Literary devices in Animal Farm and 1984 (George Orwell)

George Orwell’s book 1984, has been an important work in the eyes of many critics because of its views on a totalitarianistic society. Peter Firchow states that, “Orwell is one of the great essayists of the period—as well as in his documentary books” (Firchow). Orwell uses a variety of literary tools to embellish his novel … Read more

Literary works Animal Farm and Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood

Introduction A government is a system or organization whose purpose is to govern and authorize a community. The characteristics of a government reflect the collective outlooks of all those part of the society. By understanding and evaluating the different forms of government and their formation one can gain a perspective on the mindsets of the … Read more

Allegory – Animal Farm, The Pilgrim’s Progress

An allegory is a join of erudition that coincident an purloin belief in asphalt or curative figure, with the end of lore a in corruptive or a instruct. In metaphorical consignation, execute and dissertation the author will decide to impersonate, give a disposition to separate ideas such as kindness, necrosis and avarice. ​​​The origins of … Read more

Big Brother Is Watching (George Orwell’s 1984 and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451)

Cameras, televisions and microphones are everywhere. Our actions are constantly being monitored for various purposes. Though it generally poses no threat to our well being, nothing we do goes unnoticed. In George Orwell’s 1984 and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 neither protagonist agrees with the actions and views of their respective totalitarian governments. Due to the … Read more

George Orwell’s ‘Coming Up for Air’ / Philip Larkin’s poetry

George Orwell’s ‘Coming Up for Air’ and much of Philip Larkin’s poetry observe and share comparable features of our often less-than-precise connection with the past and how it influences our attitude towards the present and future. Orwell’s central character in ‘Coming Up for Air’, George Bowling, finds it difficult to engage with a monotonous, dehumanised … Read more

Is Attention Worth A Reputation? (“Shooting An Elephant”, George Orwell)

In “Shooting An Elephant”, George Orwell uses the final scene of the killing of the elephant to convey the unbreakable qualities of the narrator: indecisive and selfish. Due to the fact that Orwell receives two different opinions, his own and that of the natives’, he is left questioning exactly who he works for. By the … Read more

Animal Farm, Harrison Bergeron, Dulce et Decorum est and 1984

‘People must stand up against authority’ is a reoccurring theme which is being used in our wider world amongst many others. The text that relate to this theme are Animal Farm by George Orwell, Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut, Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and 1984 by George Orwell. Within the novel of … Read more

Animal Farm uses satire to convey a deeper message about Russian communism & Stalinism

Animal Farm is a fable that uses satire to convey a deeper and more relevant underlying message about Russian communism and Stalinism. This animal allegory written by George Orwell challenges the beliefs and exposes events in the Russian revolution and the cycle of communism. By using animals, he is able to portray this piece of … Read more

Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” and George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four”

Both texts reveal that resistance and rebellion are futile; the system will always win in the end, at the expense of the individual. Discuss this with reference to both texts. When distribution of power in a society is too unevenly spread, or when one group abuses their power too greatly to the detriment of others, … Read more

Brave New World and 1984

Atwood suggests that the social prediction of both novels Brave New World and 1984 “cast their shadows over our futures, 1984 with its horrific vision of a brutal, mind-controlling totalitarian state and the other, Brave New World, which proposed a different and softer form of totalitarianism.” Brave New world can be interpreted as a ‘softer … Read more

George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

Introduction With Brave New World set just under 600 years after 1984 (Vega De Febles, 94), both George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World introduce dystopias, establishing societies that are both problematic and possible. The possibility of this type of society coming to be is what evokes fear in the reader associated with … Read more

1984: Orwell's Dystopia Criticizing Individuality Oppression& Winston's Failed Attempts at Rebellion

 1984 is an anti-utopia by George Orwell, which aims at portraying a totalitarian regime where people live in constant fear and oppression of the political elite. The novel explores the theme of individuality oppression by presenting a society, where people’s conscience and beliefs are corrupted, having a sense of individuality is unneeded, wishing for … Read more

Orwell's 1984 Relevance in Modern Society: Censorship, Surveillance, & More

 1984’s Relevance to Today’s Society In 1984, by George Orwell, a future was predicted where the government would be in total power and control. As predicted, technology is an addiction to many people in this century that consumes American lives on a daily basis. In addition to the prediction of technology, Orwell was also … Read more

Brainwashing & Language: What “1984” & “Mind Control” Reveals

Manipulation of the mind and language are depicted as a weapon to show the mistreatment of power. One of the most important themes shown in the novel 1984 is psychological manipulation. The Party is able to control what they think, what they do, and how they interact with each other. The Party enforces these awful … Read more

1984 by George Orwell

1984 is a novel written by George Orwell and was published in 1949. It features a dystopian society in which Big Brother is the face of the ruling party. The Party is compelling the usage of an imagined dialect called Newspeak, which endeavors to anticipate political disobedience by dispensing with all words identified with it. … Read more

1984 – Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction

One must utilize the theories Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction in order to adequately evaluate George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984. These three categories of literary theory allow the reader to observe the dangers of authoritarian or totalitarian rule, take caution of the peril that could result of the trade of one’s freedom for security, and urge one … Read more

Exploring How Aldoux Huxley & George Orwell's Dystopian Novels Relate to Modern Society

 It is always interesting to see how dystopian novels written in the past can relate to the modern world. Aldous Huxley and George Orwell in their novels Brave New World and 1984, respectively, depict worlds that may have seemed ludacris at the time, but now appear to be more relevant than ever. Their depictions … Read more

George Orwell's 1984: Part 1 (75-149): Revolution Doubles as a Duty and a Rite of Passage

 The significant transition between part one and part two mark Section 2 (pages 75-149) of George Orwell’s nightmarish novel. From a big picture, the main theme of Part 1 is the awakening, and realization of Winston’s consciousness in which he identifies the evil of the INGSOC party, and his desire for change, and rebellion. … Read more

The Significance of Part One to Part Two in George Orwell's Novel

 The significant transition between part one and part two mark Section 2 (pages 75-149) of George Orwell’s nightmarish novel. From a big picture, the main theme of Part 1 is the awakening, and realization of Winston’s consciousness in which he identifies the evil of the INGSOC party, and his desire for change, and rebellion. … Read more

Executive Order 9066 / Orwell’s 1984 / Rothko’s ‘color-field’ work

There are a lot of questionable actions made by citizens and the government in our world today. From President Trump’s opinions on other countries and wall-building proposals, to the way some Americans treat their fellow citizens because of their gender, race, or sexual identity. One may ask, “Why that would pertain to a Humanities III … Read more

George Orwell’s warning in the novel 1984

George Orwell wrote 1984 after World War II to give a warning to the raising of USSR and Nazi Germany. He described a fictional government that is extremely dictatorial in 1984. The Inner Party of Oceania control people’s mind through manipulating media contexts, torturing thought criminals, and instigating people’s hate toward other nations. The party … Read more

1984 vs Brave New World

Society often chooses between the safety of its people and the safety of its principles. Either may be compromised for the sake of the other in drastic situations, but ultimately, a balance exists. Who creates this balance and what the balance is like, however, determines how “good” the society is. Still, “good” cannot be used … Read more

Mr. Charrington in 1984

Mr. Charrington is a fairly old man who, to Winston’s initial impression, is a friendly and helpful individual whom like Winston, has an affinity for history. Mr. Charrington appears for the first time towards the beginning of the novel. He is the owner of an antique store in the prole district of London, which  is … Read more

George Orwell, Politics and the English Language, 1946

Orwell’s thesis acknowledges how writers use degraded and inaccurate language to express a thought. The modern form of English writing contains unnecessary elements, ultimately degrading the quality of a written text.  Furthermore, Orwell specifically explains the pretentious diction and meaningless words used in writing. Though Orwell’s thesis is evident throughout the passage, he does not … Read more

George Orwell – Shooting an Elephant, Animal Farm & 1984

George Orwell was born as Eric Arthur Blair on June 25th, 1903 in Motihari, British India. He described his family background as strictly “lower-upper-middle class”. This label did not have much of a significance until his enrollment in St Cyprian’s School at the age of eight.  As a scholarship student, he was constantly reminded of … Read more

The relevance of Brave New World and 1984 in Modern Society

Introduction Brave New World and 1984 are both over sixty years old. However, they continue to be read and studied in the modern day. Both novels were intended to show that a perfect society is not achievable; 1984 was written to warn the Western world of the dangers of Communism, and Brave New World was … Read more

George Orwell – Shooting an Elephant and Langston Hughes – Salvation

Personal conscience encompasses a person’s individual relationship with the environmental situation because everyone has a different experience of reality. It can be interpreted as one’s individual thoughts, feelings and emotions based on the way they perceive things. Stanley Milgram, an American Social Psychologist, conducted a series of social psychology experiments in which he measured the willingness … Read more

Literary Analysis of Gender Roles in the Novel 1984

In the fictitious novel 1984, George Orwell uses stereotypical female characters to illustrate that men are more powerful physically and intellectually and more important in their place in society. Although Orwell portrays many different characteristics, he tends to illustrate three main roles for the women throughout the novel. The first role we see is the … Read more

Squealer, the persuasive manipulator (George Orwell’s Animal Farm)

George Orwell’s Animal Farm would not nearly be the same without a character like Squealer. The novel seeks to show how a society where all lives are entirely equal has not been, and cannot be achieved. The main character and also the dictator of the farm, Napoleon, deceives the animals and abuses his power for … Read more

The Power Of Persuasion – Animal Farm by George Orwell

Literature And Composition 1H-4 07 December 2017 The Power Of Persuasion     According to Cathy Benjamin, a reporter for Mental Floss, sixty percent of people can’t go ten minutes without telling a lie (Benjamin 1). Persuasion can be a large part of dishonesty and lying. If you can't convince someone of your lie then they … Read more

George Orwell’s 1984 / Fritz lang’s Metropolis

The themes of dystopia and the revolution and rebellion that it provokes, are highly prevalent throughout George Orwell’s literary masterpiece, Nineteen Eighty-Four (often stylised as 1984), as well as Fritz lang’s revolutionary silent film, Metropolis. To a reader who has a general historical knowledge of the eras with which each text was produced, it would … Read more

Trump’s America compared with George Orwell’s 1984 – key similarities

On several occasions, we speak of literature on a light note. Sometimes we see the fictitious work of writers as part of history or a future that may never come to pass in our generation. Whether the authors highlight concerns over the economy, environmental degradation, political anarchy and censorship, morality, or general societal guidelines, it … Read more

Manipulation : Napoleon in George Orwell’s Animal Farm

Built On Lies And Broken Promises Manipulation is art in the form of controlling others’ thoughts, feelings, ideals, actions and personalities without the person’s knowledge or consent. Many leaders use forms of manipulation to control the people of their nation. Tyrannical leaders manipulate themselves to avoid feeling guilt over their actions. Animal Farm was written … Read more

Compare Orwell’s totalitarian Oceania with power dominance of Harvey Weinstein

Introduction George Orwell’s classic novel 1984 directs us to review our understanding of a dystopian world, to challenge our beliefs, and warns against the power of totalitarianism.  He writes about the government controlling everything in the fictional country of Oceania, where the leadership abuses its power by controlling people’s thoughts and actions through fear and … Read more

Animal Farm – actions can give a misleading ideal of freedom and equality

George Orwell’s Animal Farm is written about how actions can give a misleading ideal of freedom and equality. The animals on the farm were inspired by what Old Major had told them before he died. The animals dreamed about being free but after the rebellion, they ended up being completely obedient to there new masters, … Read more

Ultimate End of Any Ideology: Totalitarianism in Orwells 1984

 “The ultimate end of any ideology is totalitarianism” (Robbins). In 1984 by George Orwell, the main character is Winston Smith who battles with oppression in Airstip One, Oceania; previously known as Great Britain, a place where the Party monitors human actions with Big Brother. Going against a ban on individuality, Winston commits rebellious acts … Read more

George Orwell’s Unique Experiences Impacting His Writing & Beliefs

 George Orwell was born as Eric Arthur Blair on June 25th, 1903 in Motihari, British India. He described his family background as strictly “lower-upper-middle class”. This label did not have much of a significance until his enrollment in St Cyprian’s School at the age of eight.  As a scholarship student, he was constantly reminded … Read more

George Orwell’s 1984: Witnessing the Danger of Totalitarian Rule

 Faced with the rise of Nazism and Stalinism, George Orwell warns that humanity, once lost to these autocracies, can never be reclaimed. Orwell’s 1984 stands as a timeless warning to all humanity of the evil of totalitarian government as he particularly focuses on the intricate aspects of a corrupt political system seen through his … Read more

Exploring the Restructuring of American Society Since 9/11: The Patriot Act and Its 1984 Connections

 The Restructuring of American Society and Government Post 9/11: Results of Crisis Management and Anti-Terrorist Regulations (and their connections to George Orwell’s 1984) Evangeline Ives, 1604963 Political Science 101 – Introduction to Politics John Church “Big Brother is Watching You” Will Varner, 2010. Examining the patterns of American democracy, and government agencies in light … Read more

Freedom is Slavery: Examining the Justness of a Totalitarian Regime in 1984 and Plato’s Republic

 Paste Freedom is Slavery. This is the slogan of the totalitarian regime that governed a dystopian version of our present-day society. In George Orwell’s 1984, this statement was used to convince citizens that blindly relinquishing freedom to members of authority was vital to both the societal and individual good. Otherwise, they would be “slaves” … Read more

Orwells #MeToo Moment in 1984 w/Ideas of Feminism, Power and Control

 Introduction  George Orwell’s classic novel 1984 directs us to review our understanding of a dystopian world, to challenge our beliefs, and warns against the power of totalitarianism.  He writes about the government controlling everything in the fictional country of Oceania, where the leadership abuses its power by controlling people’s thoughts and actions through fear … Read more

Problems with Thinking: Tech, Privacy, & 1984 – Louise L. Hay

 An American motivational author Louise L. Hay once said, “ I do not fix problems. I fix my thinking. Then problems fix themselves”(Hay). Many of the problems people face today require much thinking to solve. Technology has taken a toll on the community and the way people think. Articles such as, The effects of … Read more

Analyze Orwell’s 1984 with Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction Theory

 One must utilize the theories Historical, Biographical, and Deconstruction in order to adequately evaluate George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984. These three categories of literary theory allow the reader to observe the dangers of authoritarian or totalitarian rule, take caution of the peril that could result of the trade of one's freedom for security, and urge … Read more

How Ben Stein & 1984 Prove the Importance of Resisting Oppression & Fostering Human Emotions

 Ben Stein, an American writer, a political and economic commentator once wrote; “it is inevitable that some defeat will enter even the most victorious life. The human spirit is never finished when it is defeated…it is finished when it surrenders.” The novel 1984 by George Orwell reflects this statement by proving it to be … Read more

Exploring the Complexity of Mr. Charrington in “1984” by George Orwell

 Mr. Charrington is a fairly old man who, to Winston’s initial impression, is a friendly and helpful individual whom like Winston, has an affinity for history. Mr. Charrington appears for the first time towards the beginning of the novel. He is the owner of an antique store in the prole district of London, which … Read more

Oppression in George Orwell’s 1984 with “Big Brother is Watching You”

 Ayathma Wickramasinghe Professor Sember International Relations June 8, 2018 Propaganda Project “This is America” – Childish Gambino Recently in the United States, gun violence has been a recurring case. From police shootings, mass shootings of popular public areas, and school shootings. “This is America” sung by Childish Gambino portrays and symbolizes the significant events … Read more

1984 Book Two, Chapter 4 Analysis: The Freedom of Love and Rebellion in Orwell’s Classic

 Character Analysis Syme: “He is too intelligent. He sees too clearly and speaks too plainly. The Party does not like such people” (Orwell 33). Intelligence is known as a good quality to possess. People strive to gain intelligence so that it will benefit them. That said, Syme’s intellect is a flaw. After a while, … Read more

Character Traits in “Animal Farm”: Mr Jones, Mr Frederick & More

 Mia Pakola June 23, 2018 English 10H Teacher… Animal Farm Characters/Character Traits: Mr. Jones is the (previous) owner of the Manor farm. Mr. Jones was an incompetent farmer and never took care of his farm or the animals. He is lazy, mean and cares more about himself than others. Lazy individuals never go far … Read more

Dystopian Futures: 1984 vs Brave New World & Security vs Choice

 1984 vs Brave New World Society often chooses between the safety of its people and the safety of its principles. Either may be compromised for the sake of the other in drastic situations, but ultimately, a balance exists. Who creates this balance and what the balance is like, however, determines how “good” the society … Read more

1984 by George Orwell & V for Vendetta by James McTeigue

 1984, by George Orwell, and V for Vendetta, by James McTeigue, both present a totalitarian government that rules over a dystopian society by controlling their citizens’ lives. Winston and V, the protagonist of both novels, have motives to rebel against their totalitarian government. The parties in both the book and the novel use brainwashing … Read more

Exploring the Causes in George Orwell’s Animal Farm for How Revolution Goes Wrong

 II. Rationale Animal Farm is “an argument” because it dictates the contrasting ideologies of the infamous leaders Trotsky and Stalin of Russia during the Russian Revolution of 1917, as well as many other contrasting political viewpoints. In Animal Farm, one of the arguments is Orwell try to show how political leaders with seemingly noble … Read more

1984: George Orwell’s Gender Roles & Anti-Feminist Bias

 Emma Chivers English 10 Professor Tricic March 28, 2017 Literary Analysis of Gender Roles in the Novel 1984 In the fictitious novel 1984, George Orwell uses stereotypical female characters to illustrate that men are more powerful physically and intellectually and more important in their place in society. Although Orwell portrays many different characteristics, he … Read more

Uncovering the Truth of Communism’s Rise: Analyzing George Orwell’s Animal Farm

 George Orwell’s Animal Farm is a “historical” fiction novel that is told in the form of an extended metaphor. The setting is post-WWII and the topic is the rise of communism in Russia, an issue ever-present to the society of America at that time. The main characters in the story are the pigs, who … Read more

Censorship in Brave New World & Animal Farm

 Dongyi He Professor Ashraf English 130 02 December 2017     Throughout the world, censorship occurs in our society with its media, teaching and other manipulation tools to stop one from having individualism. Through media, information displays unique viewpoints and ideas, and when consumer only intake one source, they become bias towards other views. Similarly, … Read more

Social Justice, Despair & Social Class in George Orwell’s Works

 Joseph Vera Matthew Kaplan English IV November 17th, 2017 The Literary Themes, Styles, and Techniques of George Orwell Great English authors capture their ideals  and messages through many different ways in many different types of work. Because of so much freedom the themes, styles, and techniques chosen to be used by the author have … Read more

Control & Manipulation in Orwell’s 1984: Power of Big Brother

 Control and Manipulation of Big Brother Nineteen eighty-four by George Orwell, is a one of a kind novel with amazing themes. In George Orwell’s 1984, the main character, Winston Smith battles with brutality in Oceania, a world where everyone is being belittled and looked closely by the Inner Party. Though, Winston tries to defy … Read more

Totalitarianism, Fascism & Socialism in “Animal Farm” by George Orwell

 In this report, I will be relating the novel ‘Animal Farm’ by George Orwell with the concept of Totalitarianism, fascism and socialism. Animal farm is a fable, a satire, where many characters are related to historical figures of Imperial Russia and the Soviet society. The characters in Animal farm can be related Stalin and … Read more

Ideas of Conformity, Freedom & Individuality in “Metropolis” & “1984”

 Fritz Lang’s expressionist film, Metropolis (1927) and George Orwell’s Swiftian satire Nineteen Eighty Four (1949) dramatise the impact of repressive governments upon the individual. Lang reflects the anxieties of the Weimar Republic of Germany, under the stresses following the First World War, highlighting the consequences of rapid industrialisation and the subsequent disunity between the … Read more

Paradox of Personal Conscience in Stanley Milgram, George Orwell and Langston Hughes

 Personal conscience ecompasses a person's individual relationship with the environmental situation because everyone has a different experience of reality. It can be interpreted as one’s individual thoughts, feelings and emotions based on the way they perceive things. Stanley Milgram, an American Social Psychologist, conducted a series of social psychology experiments in which he measured … Read more

George Orwell, Politics and the English Language: A Critique of Modern Writing

 “George Orwell, Politics and the English Language, 1946”; Orwell’s thesis acknowledges how writers use degraded and inaccurate language to express a thought. The modern form of English writing contains unnecessary elements, ultimately degrading the quality of a written text.  Furthermore, Orwell specifically explains the pretentious diction and meaningless words used in writing. Though Orwell’s … Read more

Indoctrination of Children: Please Do Not Mark Us!

Cyril Connoly once said, ‘While thoughts exist, words are alive and literature becomes an escape, not from, but into living.’ Truly, thoughts are our keys to open the gates of freedom and get away from man’s world of madness and hopelessness. However, if these thoughts are suppressed, then men will lose all sense of individuality … Read more

About George Orwell’s works

In this section we provide an overview of some of Orwell’s most famous works and their relevance for today’s society.

Down and Out in Paris and London (1933)

This book is a semi-autobiographical account recounting the experiences of poverty that the author experienced during his time spent in both cities. It is split into two sections, the first detailing his time spent in Paris and the second focusing on his experiences in London.

In Paris, Orwell begins by living in a hotel attic and then moves to a cheap boarding house. He works various jobs in the city, including dishwashing and later as a plongeur, which involves cleaning up after other employees. He is exposed to the harsh realities of the life of the poor and homeless in the city, such as when he meets a fellow tramp who has resorted to eating dog food for sustenance. He also describes the poverty and squalor of the city, as well as the harassment from the police.

In London, Orwell takes up lodgings in a doss-house and takes on menial jobs such as dishwashing and scavenging. He befriends a tramp called Bozo, and together they look for work and food. They also visit the Tower Bridge Casual Ward, a charity for the homeless, where Orwell describes the poverty and desperation of those who have been forced to turn to the charity for help.

The book is significant to today’s society as it serves as a reminder of the grim reality of poverty. It also serves to highlight the need for improved social welfare systems and better support for those living in poverty. The book also serves to remind us of the power of literature to reveal truths about society, as well as to spark debate and discussion about existing social issues.

Keep the Aspidistra Flying  (1936)

This novel follows the story of protagonist Gordon Comstock, a young, middle-class man living in 1930’s London. Gordon rebels against the values of his class and his family by giving up a successful advertising career to become a poet and live in poverty.

The novel is set in the period of the Great Depression, and explores the class differences, financial anxieties, and cultural expectations that defined the era. The title of the novel is a reference to a popular song of the time, which is used throughout the novel as a metaphor for Gordon’s struggle to survive without giving up his dreams.

The novel is about the difficulty of maintaining one’s idealism and sense of self in a world that is increasingly hostile to individualism and creative endeavours. Gordon’s struggle to make ends meet while still pursuing his dreams of writing poetry is a metaphor for the difficulty of living a meaningful life in an oppressive and conformist society.

The novel is significant to today’s society as it highlights the importance of maintaining one’s individualism and creativity in a world that is increasingly dominated by consumerism and conformity. Gordon’s struggle to survive and remain true to himself is a reminder that even in a world of increasing homogeneity, it is possible to find meaning and joy in pursuing one’s own values and dreams.

Today’s society, like Gordon’s, is increasingly dominated by materialism and consumerism, and the novel serves as a reminder of the importance of maintaining individualism and creative pursuits in the face of these pressures. It reminds us that it is possible to find joy and meaning in life, even in the face of financial hardship and cultural expectations.

Homage to Catalonia (1938)

This is a non-fiction book that chronicles Orwell’s experience and observations of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). The book is an important part of Orwell’s literary and political legacy, as it provides a unique first-hand account of the war.

The narrative begins with Orwell’s arrival in Barcelona in December 1936, when he decides to join the POUM militia and fight on the side of the Republicans against Franco’s fascists. During his time in the trenches, Orwell experiences the dangers of the front lines and the atrocities of the war. He is later wounded in battle and evacuated to a hospital in Barcelona.

When Orwell returns to Barcelona after recuperating, he discovers that the city has changed drastically and is now under the control of the Communist Party. This sudden shift has resulted in the suppression of POUM and other non-Communist groups. Orwell and other POUM members soon find themselves targeted by the authorities and become victims of a political witch-hunt.

The narrative culminates in Orwell’s escape from Barcelona and eventual return to England. By the time of his return, Orwell has come to the realization that the war had become a conflict between two equally oppressive forces, and that the Republican cause had been betrayed by the Communists.

The book is significant to today’s society because it is a powerful reminder of the dangers of authoritarianism and the importance of standing up for freedom and justice. It also serves as a cautionary tale about the perils of political manipulation and the consequences of allowing ideologies to override human rights. In this way, Homage to Catalonia serves to remind us of the importance of standing up for our beliefs and fighting for a better future.

Animal Farm (1945)

Animal Farm by George Orwell is a classic novel written in 1945 that has a timeless message still relevant today. It is a satire about a group of animals who rebel against their human masters and take over the farm. The animals, led by two pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, create a new ideology of Animalism, which promises equality and freedom for all animals.

The animals develop a set of laws known as the Seven Commandments, which include that all animals are equal, no animal shall kill another animal, and no animal shall sleep in a bed. The animals work together to restore the farm and make it prosperous.

However, the pigs begin to take control and slowly start to break the laws. They change the Seven Commandments to suit their own needs, and the other animals become more and more oppressed and exploited. The pigs eventually become a tyrannical ruling class, and the other animals are left with no say in the running of the farm.

The novel serves as a warning to people that oppressive regimes will always try to exploit and control the masses. It is a cautionary tale that reminds us to be vigilant and to stand up for our rights and freedoms. Animal Farm shows how easily a society can be manipulated and how lies and deceit can be used to control the masses.

Despite being written over 70 years ago, the message of Animal Farm is still highly relevant today. The novel serves as a reminder to people in modern society to be aware of those who exploit their power and to stay aware of their rights and freedoms. Animal Farm is a timeless novel that will always be relevant in the fight against oppression and tyranny.

1984 (1948)

1984 is a dystopian novel by George Orwell, published in 1949. It is a warning of the dangers of totalitarianism, which was a growing fear in the wake of World War II.

The novel is set in a future world where the population is kept under constant surveillance by a powerful group known as the Party. The protagonist, Winston Smith, is a member of the Outer Party who works for the Ministry of Truth. Despite being a loyal Party member, he has begun to resist the oppressive regime and is determined to do whatever he can to overthrow it.

The plot of the novel follows Winston and his attempts to rebel against the Party. He meets a woman named Julia, who is also a member of the Outer Party and shares his resistance to the Party. They begin a relationship and together, they attempt to rebel and spread their beliefs. However, the Party is always one step ahead of them and they are eventually caught and subjected to torture.

The novel ends with Winston being broken and accepting the Party. He has betrayed Julia and believes the Party’s version of reality. This is meant to be a warning of the dangers of totalitarian governments and how they can manipulate people’s minds and break their spirits.

The novel is still relevant today as many governments around the world have oppressive regimes and continue to monitor and control their citizens. It is a warning of what can happen when a government has too much power and is not held accountable for its actions. It is also a reminder of the need to fight for freedom and resist oppressive systems.

Shooting an Elephant (1936)

‘Shooting an Elephant’ by George Orwell is an autobiographical essay describing the events of a day in Moulmein, Burma while he was working as a police officer in the British Imperial Police Force. The narrator is sent to deal with a troublesome elephant that had been ravaging a bazaar. He is conflicted about what to do, as he is aware of the Burmese people’s hatred for the British Empire and knows that shooting the elephant would only further fuel the resentment. After much deliberation, he decides to go through with the shooting, despite his better judgement.

The essay symbolically highlights the oppressive power of the British Empire and its effects on both the colonisers and the colonised. The narrator is aware that shooting the elephant would satisfy the Burmese people, but he is also aware that it would be seen as an act of oppression. He is caught between two worlds; he is a member of the British Empire but he is also sympathetic to the natives. The narrator’s dilemma is a representation of the subjugation of the colonised people and the moral dilemmas faced by the colonisers.

The essay is still relevant today as it highlights the power of imperialism and the moral ambiguities of colonialism. It illustrates the lengths to which the colonisers had to go to maintain their power, and the conflicting emotions of the colonised. It also serves as a reminder of the oppressive nature of imperialism and the need for people to stand up against injustice. The essay is a powerful reminder of the atrocities of imperialism and the importance of resisting oppression.